Category Archives: Uncategorized

What is Your Blindspot: Managing Cognitive Bias

Taryn R Taylor MD, MEd

I can vividly remember my first day as a REAL doctor. I started on the pediatric pulmonology service, and recall spending what felt like an hour, deliberating whether I could order Tylenol for my patient. Would it interact with the Pulmozyme treatment? Fortunately, I had very patient senior resident who calmed my nerves and was empathetic to my intern anxiety.  July is an exciting, terrifying, rewarding and sometimes frustrating month, as we celebrate a new “medical year.” Whether or not you subscribe to the controversial premise of the July effect, there is no doubt that during this time you can leave a pivotal educational footprint in the life and career of a young doctor. read more

Help support the thousands of children affected by Hurricane Harvey

The EMS for Children Innovation & Improvement Center recently reached out to the Texas Pediatric Society Foundation (TPSF) to request that they set up an Emergency Relief/Recovery giving category targeting the special needs of children post disaster. The mission of the TPSF is to enhance the well-being of Texas children by supporting efforts to help improve their health, safety and education and to make a positive impact on their lives and futures.

The funds collected by the TPSF for Emergency Relief/Recovery will be provided in the form of grants to emergency relief and recovery efforts conducted by physicians, community advocates and other child advocacy organizations in Texas during times of a natural disaster such as a hurricane, flood, fire, earthquake and other emergency events. To find out more about the TPSF visit their website at https://txpeds.org/tps-foundation. To make a donation to the TPSF Emergency Relief/Recovery giving category use the online form. read more

Pediatric Section Meeting and Reception in Las Vegas TONIGHT!!!

You’re invited to the Pediatric Section Meeting and Reception at the Advanced Pediatric Emergency Medicine Assembly.  Come join the party and mingle with other top minds in pediatric emergency medicine.

Pediatric EM Section Meeting and Reception
Wednesday, April 26, 2017
5:30 – 7:00 pm
Versailles Ballrooms 3 and 4
Paris Hotel, Las Vegas

We look forward to seeing you there!

Peanuts and Choking

Dr. Tamara Willoughby

Recently, the lay press reported a promising breakthrough in decreasing the frequency of peanut allergies in children at high risk for peanut allergy by early introduction of peanuts. (1)  In the study “peanuts” were introduced to infants between the ages of 4 and 11 months. (1)  The research shows promise to combat the increasing prevalence of peanut allergy in Western countries. (1) Although, not discussed in news reports, the peanut product given to infants in the study was not whole peanuts.  Infants were given “Bamba,” a peanut butter flavored puffed maize product. (1) Some news reports, although not all, discussed that early introduction of peanuts should be done under a physician’s care. The general public should also be reminded about the choking risk of peanuts especially in children 3 and under and that babies in this study were not given whole peanuts.   Choking is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in children 3 and under with food, toys and coins most often the culprits. (2) Small children are vulnerable to choking in many ways.  A child’s airway occludes easily with small objects because of the small diameter of the airway and young children often can’t cough with enough force to dislodge a foreign body. (2) Additionally until molars erupt, children are unable to sufficiently chew food into smaller portions adequate for swallowing. (2) Finally, even though children at age 3 to 4 have molars, they are still learning to chew and are easily distracted which can lead to choking. (2) Approximately 1 child every 5 days in the United States dies from choking on food. (2) High risk foods for choking include hot dogs, hard candy, peanuts, nuts and seeds, whole grapes, raw carrots, apples,  popcorn, marshmallows, chewing gum and globs of peanut butter. (2)  In conclusion,  lets take this opportunity to educate the public regarding choking risks in children along with enthusiasm for promising  research on peanut allergy prevention. read more

Electronic health records (EHRs): Are they good for emergency department providers and for throughput?

Mohsen Saidinejad, MD, MBA, FAAP

Children’s National Health System

With the passage of meaningful use act of 2009, requiring a phased implementation of electronic health record (EHR) system, more and more healthcare organizations have rushed to beat the technology compliance clock and to be eligible for incentives and reimbursements.  As a result of this electronic transformation, all patient-encounter data is now potentially more transparent, accurate and up to date.1   More importantly, data is more accessible, shareable, and coordinated.2 On the flipside, reliance of digital data can paralyze the entire system during system downtimes, data breaches, or data loss.  In addition to this, back-up systems and servers that are sometimes thousands of miles away can potentially put sensitive personal patient information at risk. EHRs are also expensive and are challenging to successfully implement without growing pains.  Electronic documentation also can be more tedious and time-consuming. In this article, we examine the impact of EHRs specifically on ED providers. read more