Category Archives: Education

The practice of Pediatric Emergency Medicine requires us to stay up to date with a immense amount of information. This column can help us relearn many of those items that seemed to slip out of our brains.

Let’s Talk About Sex

Atsuko Koyama, MD, MPH

As an adolescent and pediatric emergency medicine specialist with an interest in reproductive health, I was asked to write about adolescents and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). So, I’ve put together a potpourri of important, but not as commonly discussed, issues to help improve adolescents’ and your lives, with two caveats. 1) These are NOT recommendations for sexual assault or child abuse cases. 2) There are apps and websites at the end of this article for further information. These tidbits are more for what to think about when caring for an adolescent who might be sexually active… AKA every adolescent. read more

Top Five 2019 Peds Published Articles

Noah Kondamudi, MD, MBA, FAAP, FACEP, CPE

The New Year of 2020 has commenced and with it will come new challenges, new opportunities and an abundance of new information. The sheer volume of new literature published and presented in 2019 will virtually make it impossible to keep up for most practicing PEM physicians. This is an attempt to wade through the published literature in order to identify the most impactful articles published in 2019. Compiled here are arguably the top five manuscripts that have potential impact on our day-to-day practice. Surely, there may be other articles that readers find to be more relevant and more impactful to the field, and these should be discussed on our list serve and the website. Here is the list: read more

How to Give a Lecture

Intro by Chair-Elect Taryn Taylor, MD, FAAP, FACEP

ACEP in San Diego was an enriching experience. We had an opportunity to learn new techniques, see old friends and reinforce critical concepts that are essential to our practice. We opened the ACEP PEM section meeting with a dynamic presentation from Dr. Christopher Amato, who provided guidance on being an effective speaker. November’s microsite highlights education, and the editor’s thought it  a timely opportunity to showcase  a portion of Dr. Amato’s presentation. Enjoy! read more

What is Your Blindspot: Managing Cognitive Bias

Taryn R Taylor MD, MEd

I can vividly remember my first day as a REAL doctor. I started on the pediatric pulmonology service, and recall spending what felt like an hour, deliberating whether I could order Tylenol for my patient. Would it interact with the Pulmozyme treatment? Fortunately, I had very patient senior resident who calmed my nerves and was empathetic to my intern anxiety.  July is an exciting, terrifying, rewarding and sometimes frustrating month, as we celebrate a new “medical year.” Whether or not you subscribe to the controversial premise of the July effect, there is no doubt that during this time you can leave a pivotal educational footprint in the life and career of a young doctor. read more

The Road to Remediation

Jenny Sanders, MD

The road to success isn’t always straight. Some of the greatest minds and talents in recent history had their share of struggles.  Albert Einstein was slow to speak and difficulties in school; Michael Jordan was cut from his Varsity basketball team; Steve Jobs was fired from his own company. Medic al trainees may also struggle to meet various standards of performance across one or more clinical competencies. Identifying the problem resident/fellow and formulating an organized approach to remediation can be a struggle. read more