Category Archives: Education

The practice of Pediatric Emergency Medicine requires us to stay up to date with a immense amount of information. This column can help us relearn many of those items that seemed to slip out of our brains.

What is Your Blindspot: Managing Cognitive Bias

Taryn R Taylor MD, MEd

I can vividly remember my first day as a REAL doctor. I started on the pediatric pulmonology service, and recall spending what felt like an hour, deliberating whether I could order Tylenol for my patient. Would it interact with the Pulmozyme treatment? Fortunately, I had very patient senior resident who calmed my nerves and was empathetic to my intern anxiety.  July is an exciting, terrifying, rewarding and sometimes frustrating month, as we celebrate a new “medical year.” Whether or not you subscribe to the controversial premise of the July effect, there is no doubt that during this time you can leave a pivotal educational footprint in the life and career of a young doctor. read more

The Road to Remediation

Jenny Sanders, MD

The road to success isn’t always straight. Some of the greatest minds and talents in recent history had their share of struggles.  Albert Einstein was slow to speak and difficulties in school; Michael Jordan was cut from his Varsity basketball team; Steve Jobs was fired from his own company. Medic al trainees may also struggle to meet various standards of performance across one or more clinical competencies. Identifying the problem resident/fellow and formulating an organized approach to remediation can be a struggle. read more

An Emergency Medicine Program for High School Students: My Experience.

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Jason Lowe DO

Assistant Clinical Professor

Stanford University

Department of Emergency Medicine

I would like to tell you that you have inspired me to change my career goal from being a cardiologist, to an ER doctor. I want to help people when they need it most urgently. When I grow up, I want to be just like you. –Kashika Bharol

In the summer of 2016, I was approached with an opportunity to do something completely out my scope of practice and I said yes.

No, I was not asked to initiate ECMO on an emergency department patient. read more

Management of Aggression in Emergency Departments is more than just PRNs

Anik Jhonsa, MD

In recent years pediatric emergency departments have seen a dramatic rise in the number of children and families presenting seeking mental health treatment.  As a child and adolescent psychiatrist primarily working in the emergency room, I’m often asked by my Emergency Medicine colleagues to develop an “agitation plan” for patients who are deemed at risk of acting out in an aggressive manner.  Most often these requests tend to focus on the PRN medication plan should a child become aggressive or upset.  However, most successful agitation plans begin well before any medication needs to be administered. read more

Kids are smoking again…and a social media battle boils over whether e-cigarettes are a solution or a new path to an old problem.

Chair Michael H. Greenwald, MD

After years of steady decline in smoking among young people, we are now seeing a significant rise in the use of e-cigarettes or “vaping.” In December the AAP, AAFP, ACP, and ACOG joined the AMA in issuing a public statement of support for a Surgeon General report highlighting the increased use and dangers of e-cigarettes in young people.  At the same time there is a widespread counter message seen in advertisements and social media claiming the benefits of e-cigarettes and attacking the efforts of the CDC, Surgeon General and FDA.  All physicians should become educated about the issues and be prepared to discuss them with their patients.  What are the facts? read more