Category Archives: Education

The practice of Pediatric Emergency Medicine requires us to stay up to date with a immense amount of information. This column can help us relearn many of those items that seemed to slip out of our brains.

Kids are smoking again…and a social media battle boils over whether e-cigarettes are a solution or a new path to an old problem.

Chair Michael H. Greenwald, MD

After years of steady decline in smoking among young people, we are now seeing a significant rise in the use of e-cigarettes or “vaping.” In December the AAP, AAFP, ACP, and ACOG joined the AMA in issuing a public statement of support for a Surgeon General report highlighting the increased use and dangers of e-cigarettes in young people.  At the same time there is a widespread counter message seen in advertisements and social media claiming the benefits of e-cigarettes and attacking the efforts of the CDC, Surgeon General and FDA.  All physicians should become educated about the issues and be prepared to discuss them with their patients.  What are the facts? read more

It’s July, again

Maybelle Kou MD, Fellowship Director, The Altieri PEM Fellowship at Inova Children’s Hospital.

For some medical educators June and July can conjure up feelings reminiscent of Bill Murray’s character in the movie “Groundhog Day”. You’ve probably laughed at the scenes where he goes to extremes of self- injurious behavior before waking up the next morning in exactly the same place. No matter what time of year, this can feel like a daily ritual in the Emergency Department. The environment is massively complex with patient and practitioner variability, team interpersonal dynamics, regulatory and local administrative mandates,  all of which contribute to the chaos. Add workforce regulations and it seldom seems as though one works with the same learner more than once or twice during a rotation. read more

Medical Training & Physician Wellness: No More Drowning

Recent studies have shed light on a concerning trend among physicians in-training:   un-wellness.  This is manifest in increased burnout, depression and suicide rates seen among those undergoing medical training when compared to other professions. This crisis becomes cyclic when physicians with low baseline levels of wellness are unable to give optimal patient care, which in turn detrimentally influences their poor levels of wellness.  Historically physician wellness has not been a focus of medical training.  New endeavors are hampered by inadequate structure, funding and resources. read more

Teaching vs Clinical Productivity: A Zero Sum Gain?

Michael Greenwald, MD  FACEP, FAAP
Associate Professor, Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine
Emory University/Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta

It’s déjà vu all over again.  Each winter we (or at least some of us) seem genuinely shocked at how busy it’s become in the ED.  We get to enjoy a brief respite over the winter holidays and then the surge returns until that last RSV prion fades in the spring.  And just as we find ourselves in “battle mode” for the onslaught of febrile children with their insidious runny noses and ever present coughs, our affection for teaching trainees seems to wane. read more

A Model for Every Occasion

Michael Greenwald, MD  FACEP

Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine

Emory University/Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta

A new academic year is upon us and that means brand new students and interns who rotate through the emergency department with a variety of backgrounds, skills, comfort and interests.  To some this may cause a flare-up of acid reflux; but I love this time of year.  The new learners are eager and optimistic and each new face represents a puzzle.  What kind of learner do I have? Moreover – what approach should I take when trying to make the most out of each patient encounter. read more