Category Archives: 2018 EMages Winners

3rd Place EMage Winner-The Tall Tongue

Christopher Redgate, MD, MS

Kelly Kelley, MSN, RN, CPNP, CNS

Manpreet Singh, MD, MBE

Pediatric Emergency Department, Department of Emergency Medicine, Harbor-UCLA

A 13-year-old female patient presented to the emergency department (ED) for left eye pain. A clinician noted prominence in the left side of her tongue (Picture 1). Further history revealed progressive tongue swelling during the prior year along with throat fullness and “discomfort.” At that time, an Otolaryngologist (ENT) stated she had an “enlarged tongue” but subsequent follow-ups were not pursued. Since then, she developed loud snoring with no voice changes or dysphagia. read more

2nd place Emage Winner: Subgaleal Hematoma beyond the neonatal period

Deepak Choudhary, MBBS, MRCPCH, MD;  Sarah Dipalma, MD; Jessica Strauss, MD; Mary Emborsky, MD; Frank Carnevale, MD

Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Oishei Children’s Hospital, University of Buffalo, New York

A four-year-old African American female presented to our ED with one day history of bogginess of her scalp. The guardian mentioned there were two unwitnessed falls from a trampoline and bunk bed in the last two days. The family denied behavior changes, headache, neck pain, vomiting, numbness or weakness. No bleeding problems were reported by the child or family. read more

1st Place EMage Winner: A Case of the Venomous Arthropod: A Purple Toe?

Dacia J. Ticas, MD;  Cristina M. Zeretzke-Bien, MD

University of Florida College of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, UF Health, Gainesville, Florida

A 13-year-old female presented to an outside emergency room (ED) one day prior with a chief complaint of her left great toe turning purple. She denied any weakness or tingling, any shoe tightness, rubbing, or blistering. She presented to the ED again however as symptoms had not improved. The physical exam was only notable for the left great toes’ plantar surface was a deep hue of purple and black. The toe was non-tender, and was not fluctuant or with increased warmth.  The foot and toes had intact sensory and motor function. The dorsal aspect of the foot was unaffected and had an intact nail and nailbed without any visible trauma.  Pulses were palpable. read more