Category Archives: Education

The practice of Pediatric Emergency Medicine requires us to stay up to date with a immense amount of information. This column can help us relearn many of those items that seemed to slip out of our brains.

Active Learning: Tips to Improve Learner Engagement

Cheryl Yang, MD

With the transition to more virtual learning over the past year, capturing learners’ attention can sometimes feel like an uphill battle. What are some tips and strategies to improve learner engagement?

 

Active learning is an instructional method that engages students in the learning process. Active learning is superior to traditional lectures as it improves knowledge retention1, facilitates deeper understanding2, and encourages self-directed learning3.

Active learning strategies range from simple techniques that require minimal preparation to complex techniques that require more extensive preparation. Most techniques can be adapted for virtual learning (Tables 1-3). read more

Financial Wellness

Amanda Bogie, MD

How many of you knew that April was “Financial Wellness Month?” I certainly did not and IN TRUTH actually prefer “Margarita Month” or something that brings less internal conflict with my mental health. However, I do believe this is the ideal time to discuss financial wellness, as the COVID pandemic has re-enforced its importance.

Financial wellness is similar to health wellness. If left to random chance and luck, the outcomes may not be as expected or desirable. In essence, the compound effect is in play here, which means reaping huge rewards from a series of small, smart choices. (Darren Hardy, The Compound Effect) read more

Lidocaine Toxicity

Jonathan Eisenberg, MD

I use topical preparations of lidocaine daily in the emergency department (ED) to temporarily anesthetize an area of skin for a procedure.  It is painless, has quick onset, works well, and has a low side effect profile.  With older children, I will inject lidocaine with similar results and only a small poke.  But a “low” side effect profile does not mean “no” side effects.  What happens when too much lidocaine is injected or a pre-procedure application at home goes awry? read more

Definitions and Debunking Drowning Myths

Chantal Mendes, MD;  Jonathan Eisenberg, MD; Stephanie Spanos, MD; Michael Johnson, MD, MS

In my 4th year of medical school, a boy drowned in the lake near my house. It was a shocking event at the time because my perception had been that drowning was a rare tragedy, more abundant and dramatized on television than in reality. However, during my training, I have learned that drowning remains a significant cause of death in children. Although mortality rates have been trending downward in recent years, CDC data from 2019 shows that drowning is still the leading cause of accidental injury death in children aged one to four and remains one of the top three leading causes of accidental injury death in children of all ages over one year. Children under the age of 14 account for one out of every five drowning deaths and there are approximately ten deaths per day due to drowning. It is important to note that these reported numbers relate to mortality rate alone and do not include morbidity from drowning such as neurological deficits or sequelae from a drowning event. The full extent of injury secondary to submersion is difficult to know as data gathering is challenging due to misinformation that persists surrounding drowning among the public, government agencies and even the medical community. read more

DON’T BE BASIC—Caustic Ingestions

Jonathan Eisenberg, MD

It would seem a poor idea to take medical advice from non-medical professionals, for example a president with no formal scientific background, in the realm of toxic and caustic ingestions. Although cola soda should be considered caustic, the true dangers lie mostly underneath the kitchen sink and bathroom. Acid and Base ingestions are reported to be in the range of 5-15 thousand cases per year. There is a bimodal distribution of age groups affected—those under 6 year of age making up a large portion and the other being greater than 21 years of age. The pediatric and adult populations generally have different motivations behind the ingestion—exploration versus self-harm—in the vast majority of cases. Given the difference in volumes ingested in accidental cases, children have lower fatality rates than teenagers or adults. The absence of singular severe symptoms (e.g., oral lesions, vomiting, drooling, dysphagia, hematemesis, dyspnea, abdominal pain) does not reliably indicate future injury or pathology but the presence of three or more symptoms is associated with a higher likelihood of significant injury. read more