Category Archives: Ped EM Section Columns

Active Learning: Tips to Improve Learner Engagement

Cheryl Yang, MD

With the transition to more virtual learning over the past year, capturing learners’ attention can sometimes feel like an uphill battle. What are some tips and strategies to improve learner engagement?

 

Active learning is an instructional method that engages students in the learning process. Active learning is superior to traditional lectures as it improves knowledge retention1, facilitates deeper understanding2, and encourages self-directed learning3.

Active learning strategies range from simple techniques that require minimal preparation to complex techniques that require more extensive preparation. Most techniques can be adapted for virtual learning (Tables 1-3). read more

Financial Wellness

Amanda Bogie, MD

How many of you knew that April was “Financial Wellness Month?” I certainly did not and IN TRUTH actually prefer “Margarita Month” or something that brings less internal conflict with my mental health. However, I do believe this is the ideal time to discuss financial wellness, as the COVID pandemic has re-enforced its importance.

Financial wellness is similar to health wellness. If left to random chance and luck, the outcomes may not be as expected or desirable. In essence, the compound effect is in play here, which means reaping huge rewards from a series of small, smart choices. (Darren Hardy, The Compound Effect) read more

Lidocaine Toxicity

Jonathan Eisenberg, MD

I use topical preparations of lidocaine daily in the emergency department (ED) to temporarily anesthetize an area of skin for a procedure.  It is painless, has quick onset, works well, and has a low side effect profile.  With older children, I will inject lidocaine with similar results and only a small poke.  But a “low” side effect profile does not mean “no” side effects.  What happens when too much lidocaine is injected or a pre-procedure application at home goes awry? read more

Definitions and Debunking Drowning Myths

Chantal Mendes, MD;  Jonathan Eisenberg, MD; Stephanie Spanos, MD; Michael Johnson, MD, MS

In my 4th year of medical school, a boy drowned in the lake near my house. It was a shocking event at the time because my perception had been that drowning was a rare tragedy, more abundant and dramatized on television than in reality. However, during my training, I have learned that drowning remains a significant cause of death in children. Although mortality rates have been trending downward in recent years, CDC data from 2019 shows that drowning is still the leading cause of accidental injury death in children aged one to four and remains one of the top three leading causes of accidental injury death in children of all ages over one year. Children under the age of 14 account for one out of every five drowning deaths and there are approximately ten deaths per day due to drowning. It is important to note that these reported numbers relate to mortality rate alone and do not include morbidity from drowning such as neurological deficits or sequelae from a drowning event. The full extent of injury secondary to submersion is difficult to know as data gathering is challenging due to misinformation that persists surrounding drowning among the public, government agencies and even the medical community. read more

Breaking News: Handling Pediatric Orthopedic Trauma

Mark Griffiths, MD, FAAP, FACEP

I had the opportunity to sit down with Dr. Jill Flanagan, a pediatric orthopedist in Atlanta, to gather her expert opinion on how to handle common issues that present themselves while on shift in the ED. Dr. Flanagan completed her medical school and orthopedic residency at George Washington University School of Medicine, followed by training with the Children’s Orthopedics of Atlanta fellowship program.

Dr. Griffiths: A common complaint we have with many of our college members is the lack of pediatric orthopedic availability on-site combined with the closest pediatric specialist being quite a good distance away from the referring facility. What kinds of fractures can be splinted and addressed at a later time versus those which absolutely need to be transferred that day/night (besides ones that are open or grossly displaced)? read more